jobs

BET Founder Says Trump Economy Is Great for Black American Jobs

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FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2016 file photo, President-elect Donald Trump stands with BET founder Robert Johnson at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J.. Johnson is one of dozens of people who have paraded into Trump’s properties in New York and New Jersey in recent weeks for job interviews and other consultations with the Republican. Several described the meetings as serious, yet conversational, with the president-elect leading the discussion and asking questions extemporaneously, without consulting notes. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

 

  • BET founder Robert Johnson:  “When you look at African-American unemployment, … you’ve never had African-American unemployment this low and the spread between African-Americans and whites narrowing.”

 

 

Appearing on CNBC’s Squawk Box, the self-made billionaire insisted that despite the current lower-than-expected number of jobs created in March, the Trump economy is strong.

“When you look at that [January report], you have to say something is going right,” said the Democratic entrepreneur.

Johnson then added that Trump has been a boon for the black community.

“You have to take encouragement from what’s happening in the labor force and the job market,” Johnson told Squawk Box. “When you look at African-American unemployment, … you’ve never had African-American unemployment this low and the spread between African-Americans and whites narrowing.”

The television pioneer added that Trump’s policies have brought back into the job market people who have been out for a long time, “some of it based on discrimination, some of it based on changes in education, access and technology changes.”

 

Read more: BET Founder Says Trump Economy Is Great for Black American Jobs

Manufacturing Jobs up 22,000 in March; 281,000 Under Trump

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  • Since last March, the report said, the nation has added 232,000 manufacturing jobs, with all of the gain in the durable goods component 

 

By Terence P. Jeffrey | April 6, 2018 | 8:47 AM EDT

(CNSNews.com) – The United States added 22,000 manufacturing jobs in March and employment in the manufacturing sector has now increased by 281,000 since December 2016, the last month before President Donald Trump took office.

“In March, employment in manufacturing rose by 22,000, with all of the gain in the durable goods component,” the Bureau of Labor Statistics said in its monthly employment report released today. “Employment in fabricated metal products increased over the month (+9,000).

Since last March, the report said, the nation has added 232,000 manufacturing jobs.

“Over the year,” it said, “manufacturing has added 232,000 jobs; the durable goods component accounted for about three-fourths of the jobs added.”

In December 2016, the month before Trump took office, there were 12,351,000 manufacturing jobs in the United States—281,000 less than the 12,632,000 manufacturing jobs the nation reached in March.

 

The last time there were more manufacturing jobs in the United States than there were in March was in December 2008, when there were 12,850,000 manufacturing jobs. That was the last month before President Barack Obama took office.

In January 2009, the month Obama was inaugurated, manufacturing jobs dropped to 12,561,000. The number of manufacturing jobs in the United States did not exceed that number until February of this year, when it hit 12,610,000.

 

Read more: Manufacturing Jobs up 22,000 in March; 281,000 Under Trump

 

 

ECONOMY SMASHES EXPECTATIONS: +313K JOBS, RECORD 152M EMPLOYED,STOCKS HIT RECORD HIGH

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FEB JOBS BLOWOUT: +313K…
SMASHES EXPECTATIONS…
RECORD 155,215,000 EMPLOYED…
MANUFACTURING ADDS 263,000 SINCE TRUMP…
BLACK, HISPANIC UNEMPLOYMENT HISTORIC LOWS…
STOCKS HIT RECORD HIGH…
DOW +441…

 

( CNBC ) The economy added 313,000 jobs in February, crushing expectations, while the unemployment rate remained at 4.1 percent, according to a Labor Department report Friday that could help quell inflation fears.

Economists surveyed by Reuters had been expecting nonfarm payroll growth of 200,000 and the unemployment rate to decline one-tenth of a point to 4 percent.

An increase in the labor force participation rate to its highest level since September helped keep the headline unemployment number steady, as the number of those counted as not in the workforce tumbled by 653,000 to just over 95 million.

The total counted as “employed” in the household survey surged by 785,000 to a record 155.2 million.

A separate measure that takes into account those out of the workforce and the underemployed — sometimes referred to as the “real” unemployment rate — held steady at 8.2 percent.

 

JOBLESS CLAIMS HIT LOWEST LEVEL SINCE 1969

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immigration

 

Economists had been expecting 226,000 new jobless claims, a rise over the previous week. Instead, claims unexpectedly fell by 10,000 to 210,000 in the week ending on February 24.

The more stable four week moving average of claims also declined, dropping by 5,000 to 220,500. That is also the lowest level in 49 years.

Slightly more people were added to the unemployment rolls than came off them, pushing the number of continuing claims up by 57,000 to 1.93 million.

 

Read more: Winning: Jobless Claims Lowest Level Since 1969

Six-figure construction jobs are going unfilled, CEOs can’t find skilled workers

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  • 75% of contractors want to increase their headcount in 2018, thanks to the newly-approved tax reform bill
  • 50% of companies reported having a difficult time filling both craft and salaried worker positions

 

By Business Leaders FOXBusiness

The construction sector is ready to boom in 2018, but there’s just one problem: There aren’t enough qualified workers.

 

A new report released by the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC), found that 75% of contractors want to increase their headcount in 2018, thanks to the newly-approved tax reform bill, the government’s push to rollback red tape, strong economic growth and a continuation of favorable sector trends.

 

However, 50% of companies reported having a difficult time filling both craft and salaried worker positions. Over the coming year, 53% of companies told the AGC that they expect to continue struggling to find qualified applicants. These challenges come despite the fact that 60% of firms reported increasing base pay to retain or recruit professionals and 36% provided incentives and bonuses toward the same end.

“The general population doesn’t know how rewarding and profitable [construction jobs can be],” Stephen Mulva, director of the Construction Industry Institute (CII), told FOX Business. “Six-figure salaries are not uncommon.”

Read more:

 

 

ECONOMY: Goods-producing jobs up 600% in Trump’s first year

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Fox Business Charles Payne at Varney and Co.:

“Goods-producing jobs up 600% last year, that is absolutely remarkable.”

 

Charles Payne: It’s not about the service side, manufacturing, even this morning in this morning’s jobs report you have 30,000 construction jobs, 25,000 manufacturing jobs. ADP’s number for the full year – goods producing jobs, these are people who work with their hands. This is the heartland. This is what gave Trump Ohio and Pennsylvania. Those jobs up 600% year over year. Over 500,000 versus eighty something thousand.

 

 

 

 

 

TRUMP ECONOMY: DOW 25,000, +250K JOBS, LAYOFFS LOWEST SINCE 1990

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Job-cut announcements in 2017 see lowest level since 1990, Challenger report says

( CNBC by  ) U.S. employers announced plans to cut 32,423 jobs in December, bringing the year’s total to a low not seen since 1990, global outplacement consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas reported Thursday.

“The tight labor market, coupled with uncertainty surrounding health care and tax legislation, possibly kept employers from making any long-term staffing decisions this year,” CEO John Challenger said in a statement. “However, 2018 may see an increase in job cut announcements, as companies realign with consumer demand.”

Cuts in 2017 totaled 418,770, 20 percent below 2016’s number. In 1990, companies announced plans to cut 316,047 jobs.

 

Read more: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/04/job-cut-announcements-in-2017-see-lowest-level-since-1990-challenger.html