Jesus

How the Twelve Apostles of Jesus Died

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Many wonder how the 12 apostles died, but The New Testament tells of the fate of only two of the apostles: Judas, who betrayed Jesus and then went out and hanged himself, and James the son of Zebedee, who was executed by Herod about 44 AD (Acts 12:2). Read how each of the apostles spread out to minister and evangelize and how many of the apostles died for their faith.

Into All the World

Reports and legends abound and they are not always reliable, but it is safe to say that the apostles went far and wide as heralds of the message of the risen Christ. An early legend says they cast lots and divided up the world to determine who would go where, so all could hear about Jesus. They suffered greatly for their faith and in most cases met violent deaths on account of their bold witness.

Peter and Paul

Both martyred in Rome about 66 AD, during the persecution under Emperor Nero. Paul was beheaded. Peter was crucified, upside down at his request, since he did not feel he was worthy to die in the same manner as his Lord.

Andrew

went to the “land of the man-eaters,” in what is now the Soviet Union. Christians there claim him as the first to bring the gospel to their land. He also preached in Asia Minor, modern-day Turkey, and in Greece, where he is said to have been crucified.

Thomas

was probably most active in the area east of Syria. Tradition has him preaching as far east as India, where the ancient Marthoma Christians revere him as their founder. They claim that he died there when pierced through with the spears of four soldiers.

Philip

possibly had a powerful ministry in Carthage in North Africa and then in Asia Minor, where he converted the wife of a Roman proconsul. In retaliation the proconsul had Philip arrested and cruelly put to death.

Matthew

the tax collector and writer of a Gospel, ministered in Persia and Ethiopia. Some of the oldest reports say he was not martyred, while others say he was stabbed to death in Ethiopia.

Bartholomew

had widespread missionary travels attributed to him by tradition: to India with Thomas, back to Armenia, and also to Ethiopia and Southern Arabia. There are various accounts of how he met his death as a martyr for the gospel.

James

the son of Alpheus, is one of at least three James referred to in the New Testament. There is some confusion as to which is which, but this James is reckoned to have ministered in Syria. The Jewish historian Josephus reported that he was stoned and then clubbed to death.

Simon the Zealot

so the story goes, ministered in Persia and was killed after refusing to sacrifice to the sun god.

Matthais

was the apostle chosen to replace Judas. Tradition sends him to Syria with Andrew and to death by burning.

John

is the only one of the company generally thought to have died a natural death from old age. He was the leader of the church in the Ephesus area and is said to have taken care of Mary the mother of Jesus in his home. During Domitian’s persecution in the middle 90’s, he was exiled to the island of Patmos. There he is credited with writing the last book of the New Testament–the Revelation. An early Latin tradition has him escaping unhurt after being cast into boiling oil at Rome.

 

Read more: https://www.christianity.com/church/church-history/timeline/1-300/whatever-happened-to-the-twelve-apostles-11629558.html

 

Ancient Evidence for Jesus from Non-Christian Sources

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Michael Gleghorn examines evidence from ancient non-Christian sources for the life of Jesus, demonstrating that such sources help confirm the historical reliability of the Gospels.

Evidence from Tacitus

Although there is overwhelming evidence that the New Testament is an accurate and trustworthy historical document, many people are still reluctant to believe what it says unless there is also some independent, non-biblical testimony that corroborates its statements. In the introduction to one of his books, F.F. Bruce tells about a Christian correspondent who was told by an agnostic friend that “apart from obscure references in Josephus and the like,” there was no historical evidence for the life of Jesus outside the Bible.{1} This, he wrote to Bruce, had caused him “great concern and some little upset in [his] spiritual life.”{2} He concludes his letter by asking, “Is such collateral proof available, and if not, are there reasons for the lack of it?”{3} The answer to this question is, “Yes, such collateral proof is available,” and we will be looking at some of it in this article.

Let’s begin our inquiry with a passage that historian Edwin Yamauchi calls “probably the most important reference to Jesus outside the New Testament.”{4} Reporting on Emperor Nero’s decision to blame the Christians for the fire that had destroyed Rome in A.D. 64, the Roman historian Tacitus wrote:

Nero fastened the guilt . . . on a class hated for their abominations, called Christians by the populace. Christus, from whom the name had its origin, suffered the extreme penalty during the reign of Tiberius at the hands of . . . Pontius Pilatus, and a most mischievous superstition, thus checked for the moment, again broke out not only in Judaea, the first source of the evil, but even in Rome. . . .{5}

What all can we learn from this ancient (and rather unsympathetic) reference to Jesus and the early Christians? Notice, first, that Tacitus reports Christians derived their name from a historical person called Christus (from the Latin), or Christ. He is said to have “suffered the extreme penalty,” obviously alluding to the Roman method of execution known as crucifixion. This is said to have occurred during the reign of Tiberius and by the sentence of Pontius Pilatus. This confirms much of what the Gospels tell us about the death of Jesus.

But what are we to make of Tacitus’ rather enigmatic statement that Christ’s death briefly checked “a most mischievous superstition,” which subsequently arose not only in Judaea, but also in Rome? One historian suggests that Tacitus is here “bearing indirect . . . testimony to the conviction of the early church that the Christ who had been crucified had risen from the grave.”{6} While this interpretation is admittedly speculative, it does help explain the otherwise bizarre occurrence of a rapidly growing religion based on the worship of a man who had been crucified as a criminal.{7} How else might one explain that?

Evidence from Pliny the Younger

Another important source of evidence about Jesus and early Christianity can be found in the letters of Pliny the Younger to Emperor Trajan. Pliny was the Roman governor of Bithynia in Asia Minor. In one of his letters, dated around A.D. 112, he asks Trajan’s advice about the appropriate way to conduct legal proceedings against those accused of being Christians.{8} Pliny says that he needed to consult the emperor about this issue because a great multitude of every age, class, and sex stood accused of Christianity.{9}

At one point in his letter, Pliny relates some of the information he has learned about these Christians:

They were in the habit of meeting on a certain fixed day before it was light, when they sang in alternate verses a hymn to Christ, as to a god, and bound themselves by a solemn oath, not to any wicked deeds, but never to commit any fraud, theft or adultery, never to falsify their word, nor deny a trust when they should be called upon to deliver it up; after which it was their custom to separate, and then reassemble to partake of food–but food of an ordinary and innocent kind.{10}

This passage provides us with a number of interesting insights into the beliefs and practices of early Christians. First, we see that Christians regularly met on a certain fixed day for worship. Second, their worship was directed to Christ, demonstrating that they firmly believed in His divinity. Furthermore, one scholar interprets Pliny’s statement that hymns were sung to Christ, as to a god, as a reference to the rather distinctive fact that, “unlike other gods who were worshipped, Christ was a person who had lived on earth.”{11} If this interpretation is correct, Pliny understood that Christians were worshipping an actual historical person as God! Of course, this agrees perfectly with the New Testament doctrine that Jesus was both God and man.

Not only does Pliny’s letter help us understand what early Christians believed about Jesus’ person, it also reveals the high esteem to which they held His teachings. For instance, Pliny notes that Christians bound themselves by a solemn oath not to violate various moral standards, which find their source in the ethical teachings of Jesus. In addition, Pliny’s reference to the Christian custom of sharing a common meal likely alludes to their observance of communion and the “love feast.”{12} This interpretation helps explain the Christian claim that the meal was merely food of an ordinary and innocent kind. They were attempting to counter the charge, sometimes made by non-Christians, of practicing “ritual cannibalism.”{13} The Christians of that day humbly repudiated such slanderous attacks on Jesus’ teachings. We must sometimes do the same today.

Evidence from Josephus

Perhaps the most remarkable reference to Jesus outside the Bible can be found in the writings of Josephus, a first century Jewish historian. On two occasions, in his Jewish Antiquities, he mentions Jesus. The second, less revealing, reference describes the condemnation of one “James” by the Jewish Sanhedrin. This James, says Josephus, was “the brother of Jesus the so-called Christ.”{14} F.F. Bruce points out how this agrees with Paul’s description of James in Galatians 1:19 as “the Lord’s brother.”{15} And Edwin Yamauchi informs us that “few scholars have questioned” that Josephus actually penned this passage.{16}

As interesting as this brief reference is, there is an earlier one, which is truly astonishing. Called the “Testimonium Flavianum,” the relevant portion declares:

About this time there lived Jesus, a wise man, if indeed one ought to call him a man. For he . . . wrought surprising feats. . . . He was the Christ. When Pilate . . .condemned him to be crucified, those who had . . . come to love him did not give up their affection for him. On the third day he appeared . . . restored to life. . . . And the tribe of Christians . . . has . . . not disappeared.{17}

 

Read more: https://probe.org/ancient-evidence-for-jesus-from-non-christian-sources-2/

 

WIMPS! 167-YEAR-OLD CATHOLIC SCHOOL REMOVES JESUS AND MARY STATUES TO BE MORE INCLUSIVE

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  • “The word ‘Catholic’ has been removed from the mission statement, sacraments were removed from the curriculum, the lower school curriculum was changed to world religions, the logo and colors were changed to be ‘less Catholic,’ and the uniform was changed to be less Catholic

 

Officials at the San Domenico School in California decided recently to remove the Catholic statues and icons in a move to be seen as more inclusive.

They feared the statues of Jesus and Mary were alienating.
MarinIJ reported:

Removal of a number of statues and other smaller Catholic icons from the campus of San Domenico School in San Anselmo has raised concerns among some parents.

In an email to the school’s board of directors, Dominican Sisters of San Rafael and the head of school, Shannon Fitzpatrick objected to the removal of the statues and other steps the school has taken in an effort to make the school more inclusive.

“Articulating an inclusive foundation appears to mean letting go of San Domenico’s 167-year tradition as a Dominican Catholic school and being both afraid and ashamed to celebrate one’s heritage and beliefs,” wrote Fitzpatrick, whose 8-year-old son attends the school.

She added, “In our time here, the word ‘Catholic’ has been removed from the mission statement, sacraments were removed from the curriculum, the lower school curriculum was changed to world religions, the logo and colors were changed to be ‘less Catholic,’ and the uniform was changed to be less Catholic.”

Responding to follow-up questions Monday, Fitzpatrick wrote, “There are other families having the same concerns I do. Many parents feel if the school is heading in a different direction then the San Domenico community should have been notified before the signing of the enrollment for the following year.”

 

PAINTING OF JESUS INVESTIGATED AS ‘HATE CRIME,’ DESPITE OF MOSQUE LEADERS SAYING THEY’RE NOT OFFENDED

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  • Although Mosque leaders told police that they are not offended by the imagery of Jesus Christ, it has not investigators from labeling the incident as a potential hate crime.

 

Police on Long Island are investigating after someone hung a large painting of Jesus Christ on a fence at a mosque early Friday evening.

Investigators are treating the incident as a hate crime, reports NBC New York.

The painting is a crucifixion scene showing a largely silhouetted Jesus with his crown of thorns prominently featured. It appeared outside the Hillside Islamic Center in Nassau County, according to investigators.

An employee of the Hillside Islamic Center initially discovered the Jesus painting, reports CBS New York.

Surveillance camera captured video of a man placing the image on the fence, police say.

Mosque leaders told police that they are not offended by the imagery of Jesus Christ, according to News 12 Long Island.

This lack of offense has not stopped investigators from labeling the incident as a potential hate crime.

 

Read more: Painting Of Jesus Investigated As A HATE Crime [PHOTO]

MIRACLE! WOMAN’S PRAYER SAVED TEXAS BABY DURING FLOOD: ‘Dear Jesus, please let this baby breathe’

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  • Woman: ‘Dear Jesus, please let this baby breathe’
  • “Well the first prayer she said, I felt a response in that child,” Tom says

 

 

 

 

 

Story below by WFAA :

What a rescue — one that’s tough to watch.

It was 10 miles north of Canton, just after the tornadoes hit Texas on Saturday, leaving four people dead and more than 50 injured.

Tom Mitchell felt compelled to do something, anything. Without a plan, he started driving. After rolling up to a flipped truck near Myrtle Springs, he learned what was inside — a father, toddler, and infant.

“How fast is the water moving?” we asked him. “It’s moving fast enough that they can’t get the doors open,” said Tom, describing the scene.

Lacking the strength to be helpful, Tom shot unbelievable cell phone video. At one point you see five or six people in the water and then, suddenly, the infant is free — but limp.

“The infant is white, going blue-ish grey.” Tom says.

“No color at all and the eyes were not focused when I looked down at her.” replied Tom. That’s the moment when Tom would find his role in this incredible rescue. He put the phone in his pocket.

“This baby is gonna die if we don’t start CPR fast,” Tom said. “Having a negative feeling coming over me. This baby may not make it, this baby may not make it. No reaction, nothing is happening.”

 

Then a woman on scene comes over, steps over Tom’s shoulder, and starts to pray.

“Dear Jesus, please let this baby breathe,” she prayed. “Dear Jesus, please let this baby breathe.”

“Well the first prayer she said, I felt a response in that child,” Tom says.

Tom and the Good Samaritans turned their attention to the toddler, who they also revived.

When asked why he felt like this story was one he had to share, Tom said, “I think it shows how the community and strangers all come together.”

In a posting on social media Sunday from a local hospital, the father of the children said he and his infant son are doing much better. The following is what the family wrote about the toddler’s condition:

“Update on addy bug, she is stable and doing much better. Still under sedation but pulling the breathing tube in the morning to see if she can do it on her own.’

 

 

Rescuers battled to save them as rapidly rising floodwaters made it impossible for the father and his two kids to open the doors from the inside

 

 

A family were trapped in a flipped truck after tornadoes ripped through Texas

 

 

The rescuer struggled against the fast moving water with the baby balanced in his arms

 

 

A dramatic video shows the moment a family and their dying baby were rescued from their flipped truck surrounded by rapidly rising floodwaters

 

What happened to the 12 disciples of Jesus ? How did they die and where?

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What happened to the 12 disciples of Jesus ?


  • Who were the 12 disciples:New Testament Apostolic Lists
    Matt 10:2 Mark 3:16 Luke 6:14 Acts 1:13
    Andrew Andrew Andrew Andrew
    Bartholomew Bartholomew Bartholomew Bartholomew
    James son of Alphaeus James son of Alphaeus James son of Alphaeus James son of Alphaeus
    James son of Zebedee James son of Zebedee James James
    John John John John
    Judas Iscariot Judas Iscariot Judas Iscariot (not named)
    Matthew Matthew Matthew Matthew
    Philip Philip Philip Philip
    Simon (who is called Peter) Simon (to whom he gave the name Peter) Simon (whom he named Peter) Peter
    Simon the Zealot Simon the Zealot Simon who was called the Zealot Simon the Zealot
    Thaddaeus Thaddaeus Judas son of James Judas son of James
    Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

     

  • Sources on what happened to Jesus’ disciples
    • Hippolytus of Rome:
      • Birth unknown, died around 236 AD
      • See his entry in the Catholic Encyclopedia: click here
      • Here is a page on the Internet containing his writings: click here
    • Eusebius:
      • Was the Bishop of Caesarea in Palestine, known as the “Father of Church History” because he wrote about the church history.
      • Lived around 260-341 AD
      • See his entry in the Catholic Encyclopedia: click here
    • A very nice write up on the disciples (my source for this webpage): click here

    ….And now… what ever happened to the disciples of Jesus….


  • Judas
      We all know what happened to him…
  • Andrew
    • According to Hippolytus:
          Andrew preached to the Scythians [modern day Georgia] and Thracians [modern day Bulgaria], and was

      crucified

        , suspended on an olive tree, at Patrae, a town of Achaia [Greece]; and there too he was buried.

 

 

  • Bartholomew
    • According to Hippolytus, Bartholomew preached in India:
          Bartholomew, again, preached to the Indians, to whom he also gave the Gospel according to Matthew, and was

      crucified

        with his head downward, and was buried in Allanum, a town of the great Armenia [modern day southern Georgia].
    • Eusebius, in his Church History, confirms the ministry of Bartholomew in India, and adds an eye witness account:
        About that time, Pantaenus, a man highly distinguished for his learning, had charge of the school of the faithful in Alexandria… Pantaenus…is said to have gone to India. It is reported that among persons there who knew of Christ, he found the Gospel according to Matthew, which had anticipated his own arrival. For Bartholomew, one of the apostles, had preached to them, and left with them the writing of Matthew in the Hebrew language, which they had preserved till that time. —- (Book 5, Chapter 10)
  • James, Son of Alphaeus
    • Hippolytus identifies that James was stoned to death in Jerusalem:
          And James the son of Alphaeus, when preaching in Jerusalem, was

      stoned to death

        by the Jews, and was buried there beside the temple.
  • James, Son of ZebedeeJames was the brother of John, the disciple “that Jesus loved”.
    • According to Hippolytus:
          James, his brother, when preaching in Judea,

      was cut off with the sword

        by Herod the tetrarch, and was buried there.
    • Eusebius descibed more precisely what was cut off of James:
        First Stephen was stoned to death by them, and after him James, the son of Zebedee and the brother of John, was beheaded… (Book 3, Chapter 5)

      Yep… James’ head was cut…

     

 

 

 

 

  • John, brother of James and son of ZebedeeJohn was one of the few disciples that did not die a cruel death, but of “old age”.
    • Eusebius discusses the reason that John wrote his Gospel:
          “Matthew and John have left us written memorials, and they, tradition says, were led to write only under the pressure of necessity…And when Mark and Luke had already published their Gospels, they say that John, who had employed all his time in proclaiming the Gospel orally, finally proceeded to write for the following reason. The three Gospels already mentioned having come into the hands of all and into his own too, they say that he accepted them and bore witness to their truthfulness; but that

      there was lacking in them an account of the deeds done by Christ at the beginning of his ministry

        .” (Book 3, Chapter 24)
    • According to Hippolytus, John was banished by Domitian to the Isle of Patmos, and later died in Ephesus:
          John, again, in Asia, was banished by Domitian the king to the isle of Patmos, in which also he wrote his Gospel and saw the apocalyptic vision; and

      in Trajan’s time he fell asleep at Ephesus

        , where his remains were sought for, but could not be found.

     

  • Matthew/Levi
    • Eusebius referenced to Bishop Papias of Hierapolis, as early as c. 110 A.D., bearing witness to Matthew’s authorship of his gospel:
        ….Matthew put together the oracles [of the Lord] in the Hebrew language, and each one interpreted them as best he could.” (Eusebius, Book 3, Chapter 39)
    • According to Hippolytus:
          Matthew wrote the Gospel in the Hebrew tongue, and published it at Jerusalem, and

      fell asleep

        at Hierees, a town of Parthia.\224 [Parthia is near modern day Tehran]
  • Simon/Peter
    • Eusebius, quoting Papias of Hierapolis (c. 110 A.D.), records a tradition that the Gospel of Mark preserved the Gospel as preached by Peter:
        “Mark having become the interpreter of Peter, wrote down accurately whatsoever he remembered…. he accompanied Peter…” —- (Book 3, Chapter 39)
    • Irenaeus (c. 180 A.D.) records a similar tradition, and mentions that Peter and Paul founded the Church in Rome:
        “Matthew also issued a written Gospel among the Hebrews in their own dialect, while Peter and Paul were preaching at Rome, and laying the foundations of the Church. After their departure, Mark, the disciple and interpreter of Peter, did also hand down to us in writing what had been preached by Peter…” —- (Irenaeus, “Against Heresies”, Book 3, Chapter 1)
    • Eusebius records that Peter was put to death under Nero in Rome:
          It is, therefore, recorded that

      Paul was beheaded in Rome

          itself, and that

      Peter likewise was crucified under Nero

        . This account of Peter and Paul is substantiated by the fact that their names are preserved in the cemeteries of that place even to the present day. —- (Book 2, Chapter 25)

      (Paul was a Roman citizen can cannot be crucified but got an “easier” death sentence)

    • Hippolytus confirmed the fact that Peter was crucified by Nero in Rome:
          Peter preached the Gospel in Pontus, and Galatia, and Cappadocia, and Betania, and Italy, and Asia, and

      was afterwards crucified by Nero in Rome with his head downward, as he had himself desired to suffer in that manner

        .
  • Philip
    • According to Hippolytus, Philip preached and was executed in what today is eastern Turkey:
          Philip preached in Phrygia, and

      was crucified

        in Hierapolis with his head downward in the time of Domitian, and was buried there.
  • Simon the Zealot
    • According to Hippolytus, Simon the Zealot was the second Bishop of Jerusalem:
          Simon the Zealot, the son of Clopas, who is also called Jude, became bishop of Jerusalem after James the Just, and fell asleep and

      was buried there at the age of 120 years

        .
  • Thaddaeus/Judas son of JamesAccording to Mat 10:3 (KJV): Philip, and Bartholomew; Thomas, and Matthew the publican; James the son of Alphaeus, and Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus…. Thaddaeus is also known as Lebbaeus.
    • Hippolytus records:
          Jude, who is also called Lebbaeus, preached to the people of Edessa, and to all Mesopotamia, and

      fell asleep

        at Berytus, and was buried there.

     

  • Thomas
    • Hippolytus records that Thomas was an active missionary, and that he met his fate in India:
          And Thomas preached to the Parthians, Medes, Persians, Hyrcanians, Bactrians, and Margians, and

      was thrust through in the four members of his body with a pine spear

        at Calamene, the city of India, and was buried there.


  • After thought
    • Many of Jesus disciples died cruel deaths for preaching the gospel
    • From other sources (e.g., Paul’s letters, Pliny’s letters to Trajan ( click here ), all they need to do escape such a cruel death was to denounce their faith.

 

 

SOURCE: http://www.ichthus.info/Disciples/intro.html

 

 

 

JESUS AND BIBLE PROPHECIES HE FULFILLED – BIRTH, DEATH AND RESURRECTION

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What sets the Bible apart from ALL books in the world? Its pages of PROPHECIES. No other book exists throughout history of mankind but the Bible that dares to fill its pages with prophecies, with most already fulfilled while others still yet to come. Other religious books write about moral platitudes but don’t contain prophecies. Below are the Bible prophecies Jesus fulfilled – His birth, death and resurrection.
—————————————————————————————————————————————-

Genuine divine Bible prophecy

  • The crucifixion of Jesus: Predicted 500 years before He was born and before crucifixion exist and was used in the world as a form of capital punishment.

 

Prophecy is foretelling an event in such detail before it happens so as to necessarily require divine guidance. The Bible is a book containing hundreds of detailed prophecies. There are, for example, well over 60 distinct predictions in regard to our divine Saviour Jesus Christ. Here is a sample of just 10 prophecies that foretold the crucifixion of Christ. Not only were the predictions made 1000 years before Christ came from heaven to earth, but they were made over 500 years before crucifixion was first used anywhere in the world as a form of capital punishment! Crucifixion didn’t exist when the prophecies were made.

A scientist picked out 48 such prophecies and determined that the probability of one man randomly fulfilling them all is 1 in 10 to the exponent of 157. That is one followed by 157 zeros! Your chances of winning a typical lottery jackpot is about 1 in 108. (100,000,000) Yet, Jesus fulfilled all the prophecies!

 

Concerning his birth Prophesied Fulfilled
1. Born of the seed of woman Gen 3:15 Gal 4:4
2. Born of a virgin Isa 7:14 Mt 1:18-25
3. Seed of Abraham Gen 22:18 Mt 1:1
4. Seed of Isaac Gen 21:12 Lk 3:23+34
5. Seed of Jacob Num 24:17 Lk 3:34
6. Seed of David Jer 23:5 Lk 3:31
7. Tribe of Judah Gen 49:10 Rev 5:5
8. Family line of Jesse Isa 11:1 Lk 3:32
9. Born in Bethlehem Mic 5:2 Mt 2:1-6
10. Herod kills the children Jer 31:15 Mt 2:16-18

Concerning his nature

Prophesied

Fulfilled

11. He pre-existed creation Mic 5:2 1 Pet 1:20
12. He shall be called Lord Ps 110:1 Acts 2:36
13. Called Immanuel (God with us) Isa 7:14 Mt 1:22-23
14. Prophet Deut 18:18-19 Acts 3:18-25
15. Priest Ps 110:4 Heb 5:5-6
16. Judge Isa 33:22 Jn 5:22-23
17. King Ps 2:6 Jn 18:33-37
18. Anointed by the Spirit Isa 11:2 Mt 3:16-17
19. His zeal for God Ps 69:9 Jn 2:15-17

Concerning his ministry

Prophesied

Fulfilled

20. Preceded by a messenger Isa 40:3 Mt 3:1-3
21. To begin in Galilee Isa 9:1-2 Mt 4:12-17
22. Ministry of Miracles Isa 35:5-6 Mt 9:35;11:4
23. Teacher of parables Ps 78:1-4 Mt 13:34-35
24. He was to enter the temple Mal 3:1 Mt 21:10-12
25. Enter Jerusalem on donkey Zech 9:9 Mt 21:1-7
26. Stone of stumbling to Jews Isa 28:16; Ps 118:22 1 Pet 2:6-8
27. Light to Gentiles Isa 49:6 Acts 13:46-48

The day Jesus was crucified

Prophesied

Fulfilled

28. Betrayed by a friend Ps 41:9 Jn 13:18-27
29. Sold for 30 pieces of silver Zech 11:12 Mt 26:14-15
30. 30 pieces thrown in Temple Zech 11:13 Mt 27:3-5
31. 30 pieces buys potters field Zech 11:13 Mt 27:6-10
32. Forsaken by His disciples Zech 13:7 Mk 14:27+50
33. Accused by false witnesses Ps 35:11+20-21 Mt 26:59-61
34. Silent before accusers Isa 53:7 Mt 27:12-14
35. Wounded and bruised Isa 53:4-6 1 Pet 2:21-25
36. Beaten and spit upon Isa 50:6 Mt 26:67-68
37. Mocked Ps 22:6-8 Mt 27:27-31
38. Fell under the cross Ps 109:24-25 Jn 19:17; Lk23:26
39. Hands and feet pierced Ps 22:16 Jn 20:24-28
40. Crucified with thieves Isa 53:12 Mt 27:38
41. Prayed for enemies Isa 53:12 Lk 23:34
42. Rejected by His own people Isa 53:3 Jn 19:14-15
43. Hated without cause Ps 69:4 Jn 15:25
44. Friends stood aloof Ps 38:11 Lk22:54;23:49
45. People wag their heads Ps 22:7;109:25 Mt 27:39
46. People stared at Him Ps 22:17 Lk 23:35
47. Cloths divided and gambled for Ps 22:18 Jn 19:23-24
48. Became very thirsty Ps 22:15 Jn 19:28
49. Gall and vinegar offered Him Ps 69:21 Mt 27:34
50. His forsaken cry Ps 22:1 Mt 27:46
51. Committed Himself to God Ps 31:5 Lk 23:46
52. Bones not broken Ps 34:20 Jn 19:32-36
53. Heart broken Ps 69:20;22:14 Jn 19:34
54. His side pierced Zech 12:10 Jn 19:34+37
55. Darkness over the land Amos 8:9 Lk 23:44-45
56. Buried in rich man’s tomb Isa 53:9 Mt 27:57-60

His Resurrection & Ascension

Prophesied

Fulfilled

57. Raised from the dead Ps 16:8-11 Acts 2:24-31
58. Begotten as Son of God Ps 2:7 Acts 13:32-35
59. Ascended to Heaven Ps 68:18 Eph 4:8-10; John 3:13
60. Seated beside God Ps 110:1 Heb 1:3+13

 

 

SOURCE: http://www.bible.ca/b-prophecy-60.htm