Jerry Brown

GOV. JERRY BROWN: CALIFORNIA TAXPAYERS ARE ‘FREELOADERS’ FOR OPPOSING NEW GAS TAX AND CAR FEE HIKES

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Jerry Brown minimum wage $15 (Frederic J. Brown / AFP / Getty)

 

( Breitbart ) California Governor Jerry Brown referred to taxpayers as “freeloaders” last week for objecting to his new gas tax and car fee hikes.

“The freeloaders — I’ve had enough of them … They have a president that doesn’t tell the truth and they’re following suit,” he said. Brown was speaking in Orange County, defending State Assembly newcomer Josh Newman (D-Fullerton), who is facing a recall effort after voting for Brown’s new transportation taxes in April.

The new tax raises existing gas taxes — already among the highest in the nation — by 12 cents per gallon, with higher taxes on diesel, and slaps car owners with higher annual registration fees. Critics have pointed out that the burden of the tax falls most heavily on middle-class Californians.

The Orange County Register, which covered Brown’s remarks, adds that Brown is sparing no effort to keep Newman in office. “He’ll have whatever he needs,” the Register quotes the governor as saying.

 

Read more: Jerry Brown: California Taxpayers are ‘Freeloaders’

CRAZY CALIFORNIA CLIMATE CHANGE LAWS EXPECT TO DESTROY JOBS, DAIRY INDUSTRIES, INCREASE GAS PRICES AND ELECTRICITY AND MAKE MORE HOMES EXPENSIVE TO BUILD

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  •  climate goal could cost California households an average of $3,000 annually.
  • Gasoline prices, for example, are headed up.  And electricity prices will likely go up. Gas prices have spiked 115% since March.
  •  In 2000, California accounted for 5.6% of U.S. manufacturing investment. Today, it accounts for 1.8%, she said
  • Just this year, 53 dairies have gone bankrupt, left the state or simply closed their doors, a trend likely to accelerate, she said.
  • the goal will add $45,000 to the average cost of a 2,500-square-foot home in California. The higher cost is likely to lead to fewer new homes, exacerbating the state’s housing and employment problems.

 

An LATimes article about upcoming  Climate Change laws is painful to read if you live in that state. If you live in Nevada, particularly Las Vegas, you know exodus is coming and these Democrat-loving Californians are going to sell their homes, pack their stuff and move here next year – and STILL REMAIN a Democrat, because these people are dumb and clueless about the fact it’s their Democrat government responsible for their economic pain and suffering.

Below is a summary from the article and I broke it down to their corresponding effects.

California’s climate fight could be painful — especially on job and income growth

 

Ralph Vartabedian by Ralph Vartabedian Contact Reporter

 

Two key laws this summer kicked California’s climate change fight into high gear.

Senate Bill 32 requires the state to cut greenhouse gases 40% below their level of 1990 — based on evidence that a global reduction at that level would limit warming to 2 degrees Celsius above the temperature levels of a few decades ago.

Senate Bill 1383 requires similar reductions in methane, refrigeration gases and black carbon.

Before signing SB 32, Gov. Jerry Brown said he didn’t expect problems.

“California is doing something no other state has done,” he said. “We are bringing into law real measures backed up by the real power of the state of California. It will take some balance that we don’t overdo it, but I am not afraid we are going to get to that point.”

Critics, however, say that consigning Californians’ economic well-being to untested regulatory systems is reckless, and the hit on wallets has already begun.

 

EFFECTS ON GAS PRICES AND ELECTRICTY:

Gasoline prices, for example, are headed up under several very complex regulatory systems, including the state’s low-carbon fuel standard and the cap-and-trade auction market.

And electricity prices will likely go up. At least half of California’s electricity must come from renewable sources by 2030, and though solar panel costs have dropped sharply and are subsidized by a 30% federal tax credit, existing long-term contracts already signed by utilities will likely continue to drive up the price of electricity, Borenstein said. 

The state’s shift to natural gas for 60% of its in-state electricity generation could also lead to higher electricity prices. Gas prices have spiked 115% since March, though the impact has not yet filtered down to consumers.

When gasoline or electricity prices go up, people tend to use less. Manufacturers, however, may leave the state.

 

EFFECTS ON MANUFACTURING

“Over the long term, manufacturers will be choosing to put their money elsewhere,” said Dorothy Rothrock, president of the California Manufacturing and Technology Assn. In 2000, California accounted for 5.6% of U.S. manufacturing investment. Today, it accounts for 1.8%, she said. A study by NERA, an economics research firm working for the manufacturers association, asserted that the climate goal could cost California households an average of $3,000 annually.

 

 EFFECTS ON HOME BUILDING INDUSTRY

The Energy Commission, for example, has a goal that by 2020 all new homes will have to meet a net zero energy mandate, meaning solar roofs will have to supply all the home’s power while large amounts of insulation lower energy demand. Other rules apply later to government and commercial buildings.

“It means buildings will be part of the solution,” said energy commissioner David Hochschild.

But Dave Cogdill, president of the California Building Industry Assn., said the goal will add $45,000 to the average cost of a 2,500-square-foot home in California. The higher cost is likely to lead to fewer new homes, exacerbating the state’s housing and employment problems.

And a slowdown in construction could potentially reducing gross state product by $7.5 billion and employment by 75,000 jobs, said Brad Williams, an economist at Capitol Matrix Consulting who studied the legislation for the building association.

EFFECTS ON DAIRY INDUSTRIES: COWS ARE GUILTY OF CLIMATE CHANGE

 

Dairies are also bracing for a difficult future, said Anja Raudabaugh, executive director of the Western Dairymen’s Assn. Just this year, 53 dairies have gone bankrupt, left the state or simply closed their doors, a trend likely to accelerate, she said.

“There is no way we can manage the reductions they want,” she said.

Dairy herds produce roughly 10 million metric tons of the greenhouse gas methane each year, a consequence of cow flatulence, burping and manure.

Under SB 1383, that has to change.

At a heated meeting in June, dairy officials pleaded with the Air Resources Board that they already reduced methane emissions. Air board scientist Ryan McCarthy suggested that new technology could help, and the discussion turned to an experimental system from Argentina that would capture gas in a backpack on each cow through a hose inserted into their digestive system.